Snowblower FAQs

What’s the difference between single or two-stage snowblowers?
Single stage models use an auger to scoop snow and discharge it through a chute. Two-stage (a.k.a. dual stage) models use an auger to collect the snow and a high-speed impeller to discharge it through the chute.
What kind of snowblower is best for me?
How do I clear a jam in my snowblower?
Are snowblowers dangerous?
What’s the difference between single or two-stage snowblowers?
Single stage models use an auger to scoop snow and discharge it through a chute. Two-stage (a.k.a. dual stage) models use an auger to collect the snow and a high-speed impeller to discharge it through the chute.
What kind of snowblower is best for me?
A single stage electric snowblower is a good option for clearing less than four inches (about 10 centimeters) of snow from a deck or porch. It requires use of an outdoor power cord. A single stage gas snowblower is best for clearing less than eight inches (about 20 centimeters). A dual stage gas snowblower is ideal for clearing medium to heavy snowfall greater than eight inches (approx. 20 centimeters).
How do I clear a jam in my snowblower?
While some clogging may be inevitable, we use a snowblower no-stick spray on areas that come into contact with snow. This will reduce the number of jams. Be careful when clearing a snow or ice jam. People suffer serious hand and arm injuries when they attempt to clear snowblower jams with their hands. Snowblower augers will continue to spin for a while after the bale arm located at the handle has been released. Therefore, one should never place a hand or arm inside of a chute. Thick gloves will not prevent injury. Instead, a small shovel or the end of a broom should be used to clear snow and ice jams in the auger housing or chute after the motor has been shut off.
Are snowblowers dangerous?
Ice can be projected at high speeds and cause serious eye injury. Always wear a pair of safety eye glasses. Children and pets should remain indoors when a snowblower is in operation because the cloud of snow created by the snowblower or snowthrower while in operation hinders visibility.